Pacemaker Evaluation

CareCube cardiology specializes in Pacemaker Battery Replacement. Our clinicians are devoted to serving patients using Pacemakers. Call us at (718)-439-5111 for more information.

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What is a pacemaker?

A pacemaker is a device placed in the abdomen to regulate your heartbeat. The pacemakers purpose is to control arrhythmias. An arrhythmia when the heart beats at an irregular rate, this can be a slow beating heart, too fast of a beating heart, or when not enough blood is being pumped in and out of your heart.
A pacemaker can work in two different ways. The first being demand pacing programming, this program of the device allows for the monitoring of your heartbeat. If the pacemaker detects that your heart missed a beat or is beating too slow it will send an electrical beat to your heart. The second program is rate-responsive pacing. This program is designed to either slow down the beating of your heart or make your heart beat faster based on your activity level. It uses your breathing, blood temperature, sinus node rate, and other factors in determining the level your heart should be beating.

Once the low battery signal on your Pacemaker is activated, it is time to schedule a visit to have the battery replaced. The procedure is performed by going through the scar made from implanting the Pacemaker. The procedure takes between 30-45 minutes to perform.

Who needs a pacemaker? 

Pacemakers can be used by children, adults and the elderly. There are many reasons a doctor may recommend a pacemaker. The most common reasons would be a heart block or when your heart beats slower than expected. Heart blocks occur due to various reasons including age, heart attack, nerve disorders, muscle disorders, and many other conditions.

What to expect during placement of a pacemaker

The placement of a pacemaker requires you to undergo minor surgery. The surgery can be conducted at a hospital or a qualified heart treatment facility. Due to it being a minor surgery you are given medicine to make you relax and the doctor will numb the area where the pacemaker will be placed. You should not feel any pain during the procedure. The procedure begins with your doctor inserting an IV that will supply the medicine to relax you. Then your doctor will insert a needle into one of your larger veins and thread the pacemaker wires through the vein until they reach your heart. Your doctor will then make a small incision on your chest or abdomen and input the pacemaker machine. The doctor tests the machine to make sure it works properly then closes your incision. The entire surgery is only a few hours long.

How does a pacemaker affect my lifestyle?

In most individuals with a pacemaker, lifestyle can still include sports and exercise. Full-contact sports are not recommended due to the damage it can inflict on the machine. You will have to be aware of surrounding in the case of electrical device and devices that will have a stronger magnetic field. These items can affect the signaling your pacemaker gives to your heart and can ultimately make the pacemaker not function properly. There are a few devices in particular that are recommended to be cautious around. These devices include cell phones, microwave ovens, metal detectors, high tension wires, electrical generators, and industrial welders. For cell phone use it is recommended to always hold it away from the side your pacemaker is on and to not allow the phone to be put in a pocket over the pacemaker. Always notify medical professionals and security officials that you have a pacemaker and carry your pacemaker card in your purse or wallet. Your pacemaker will need to be examined by your doctor about every three months. The examinations are required because the pacemaker can stop working at any time due to a dislodged or broken wire, low battery, devices that have interfered with your pacemakers electrical signaling, and if your heart disease has gotten worse. Over time the batteries and wires of your pacemaker will need to be replaced.

 

What is a Pacemaker Battery Replacement procedure?

IModern Pacemakers have batteries that last between seven and eleven years. During regular checkups, your doctor will use an electric wand to collect information from your Pacemaker, including the remaining battery life. Some information can be transmitted over the phone or online, but you should still see your doctor in person at least once a year.
Once the low battery signal on your Pacemaker is activated, it is time to schedule a visit to have the battery replaced. The procedure is performed by going through the scar made from implanting the Pacemaker. The procedure takes between 30-45 minutes to perform.